Tier 1 National Org

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Yesterday, July 19

  • 12:21pm

    Now the Janus decision has helped push the National Right to Work Committee and its sister organizations closer to that goal.

    In December 1953, a group of anti-labor business leaders gathered in Washington, DC, for the first in a series of secret meetings. The meetings were organized by a Southern paper-box manufacturer named Edwin S. Dillard, who was heir to the Old Dominion Box Company and had spent years fighting to keep his workforce from joining a union. The goal of the meetings: to find a way to crush the American labor movement.

    This article was reported in partnership with the Investigative Fund at the Nation Institute. Additional research by Joseph Hogan.

    Dillard enlisted the help of a prominent corporate public-relations firm, Selvage & Lee, to find others who might be committed to the cause. According to a trove of legal documents shared with The Nation by the UAW, their efforts brought together retired congressman Fred Hartley, who was notorious for spearheading what labor referred to as the “slave-labor bill”; Whiteford Blakeney, the nation’s premiere anti-union attorney (in later years, he would go on to help lead what one federal judge called a “full-scale war against unionization” at the J.P. Stevens textile plant against Crystal Lee Sutton, the real-life Norma Rae, and her coworkers); and representatives from GE, the Santa Fe Railway, and a host of Southern tobacco, manufacturing, and textile firms.

    At one of these meetings, Dillard told the group that “it was time for the businessmen to realize that [the union shop] was an awful threat to our country, to their operations, to business in general all over the United States.” The group resolved to form “some kind of organization” to deal with labor.

    By the third meeting, on December 15, 1954, the group (by then a collection of about a dozen true believers) had settled on a plan, at once simple and radical: Rather than continue to fight labor head-on, from the position of management, they would break labor from within. The key to this effort was an idea that had begun circulating on the segregationist Southern right for years and had recently been codified in a controversial provision of the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 (crafted by the group’s own Fred Hartley). This provision, known as Section 14(b), allows states to pass “right-to-work” laws. Such laws permit workers to not pay any dues to a union that represents them in the workplace, and they are some of the most effective ways to defund and defang American labor from within.

    In honor of that aspiration, the group dubbed itself the National Right to Work Committee...

    Read more
  • 12:21pm

    Now the Janus decision has helped push the National Right to Work Committee and its sister organizations closer to that goal.

    In December 1953, a group of anti-labor business leaders gathered in Washington, DC, for the first in a series of secret meetings. The meetings were organized by a Southern paper-box manufacturer named Edwin S. Dillard, who was heir to the Old Dominion Box Company and had spent years fighting to keep his workforce from joining a union. The goal of the meetings: to find a way to crush the American labor movement.

    This article was reported in partnership with the Investigative Fund at the Nation Institute. Additional research by Joseph Hogan.

    Dillard enlisted the help of a prominent corporate public-relations firm, Selvage & Lee, to find others who might be committed to the cause. According to a trove of legal documents shared with The Nation by the UAW, their efforts brought together retired congressman Fred Hartley, who was notorious for spearheading what labor referred to as the “slave-labor bill”; Whiteford Blakeney, the nation’s premiere anti-union attorney (in later years, he would go on to help lead what one federal judge called a “full-scale war against unionization” at the J.P. Stevens textile plant against Crystal Lee Sutton, the real-life Norma Rae, and her coworkers); and representatives from GE, the Santa Fe Railway, and a host of Southern tobacco, manufacturing, and textile firms.

    At one of these meetings, Dillard told the group that “it was time for the businessmen to realize that [the union shop] was an awful threat to our country, to their operations, to business in general all over the United States.” The group resolved to form “some kind of organization” to deal with labor.

    By the third meeting, on December 15, 1954, the group (by then a collection of about a dozen true believers) had settled on a plan, at once simple and radical: Rather than continue to fight labor head-on, from the position of management, they would break labor from within. The key to this effort was an idea that had begun circulating on the segregationist Southern right for years and had recently been codified in a controversial provision of the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 (crafted by the group’s own Fred Hartley). This provision, known as Section 14(b), allows states to pass “right-to-work” laws. Such laws permit workers to not pay any dues to a union that represents them in the workplace, and they are some of the most effective ways to defund and defang American labor from within.

    In honor of that aspiration, the group dubbed itself the National Right to Work Committee...

    Read more
  • 12:10pm
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    ATU LOCAL 282 ANTICIPATED AND PREPARED OURSELVES FOR THIS DECISION. REMEMBER BROTHERS AND SISTERS, WE STAND UNITED!
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      ===========================================================================
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  • 12:02pm
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    Image: laborunion_02262018.jpg
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  • 12:01pm

    I have an embarrassing confession to make: I underestimated how much anti-worker extremist groups really hate organizations that empower working people. After all, I have a good union job. Plus, my employer respects and supports collective bargaining.

    Five U.S. Supreme Court justices reminded the country on June 27 that groups like the Freedom Foundation not only detest labor unions; they want them to be a thing of the past.

    However, working people are more determined than ever to continue to fight for our right to stand together in unions now and in the future. And we’re calling on the men and women we elect to municipal, state and federal offices to stand beside us.

    We need legislation that makes it easier for working people to join together in a union, not harder.  

    Some federal lawmakers have already stepped up to the plate by introducing multiple labor bills, including the recent Public Service Freedom to Negotiate Act, to help working people stand together to fight for higher wages, respect on the job and health care and retirement benefits.

    The Public Service Freedom to Negotiate Act, introduced by Sen. Mazie Hirono (D-Hawaii) and Rep. Matt Cartwright (D-Pa.), would make it easier for secretaries, school food service managers, trash collectors and other Americans working in public sector to form unions regardless of the state they live in.

    We need more bills like this to help combat the effects of decades of attacks on working people funded by billionaire CEOs and corporate special interests. The Freedom Foundation, Koch Brothers, and others have tried to dehumanize public servants so that people don’t always see that we’re one of them.

    We’re working parents like Nicole Jackson of Pennsylvania who is just trying to provide a better life for our children. When Nicole didn’t have the support of a union, she was fired by an employer for being sick during a difficult pregnancy.

    We’re older people like Jim Betts of Maine who want the opportunity to retire with dignity after years of hard work, playing by the rules and saving for the future. Jim and his wife both have chronic health conditions, which require very expensive medications. The health insurance...

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  • 11:57am
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    How Corporations Plan To Use /Janus/ To Turn Workers Against Their Own
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    *How Corporations Plan To Use /Janus/ To Turn Workers Against Their Own
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    Unions
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    Unions*
     
     
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    A union buster may be coming to your door.
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    *A union buster may be coming to your door.*
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  • 11:55am
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    Image: 42_08_brooks_03.jpg
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  • 11:52am
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    ========  BREAKING: THE SUPREME COURT JUST JOINED THE CORPORATE ATTACK ON
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    How Corporations Plan To Use /Janus/ To Turn Workers Against Their Own
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    WORKING PEOPLE, BUT WE WON'T SIT QUIETLY. JOIN US:  ================
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    Unions
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    A union buster may be coming to your door.
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    READ MORE (https://www.facebook.com/aflcio/videos/10156322608066153/UzpfSTI0MTQyMDExOTIzNTM0NDoyMDAzMzg4Mjc2MzcxODQ0/)
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    READ MORE (http://inthesetimes.com/features/janus_opt-out_campaign_state_policy_network_union_busting.html)
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  • 11:41am
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    Image: freedomtojoin.png
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  • 11:36am
    ...
    Changes to Description
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    =============================================================================
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    ATU LOCAL 282 ANTICIPATED AND PREPARED OURSELVES FOR THIS DECISION. REMEMBER BROTHERS AND SISTERS, WE STAND UNITED!
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    Image: local282.png
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    Image: freedomtojoin.png
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    ======== LOCAL 282-ROCHESTER, NY, JOINS WITH ADVOCATES TO PUSH FOR MORE
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    ========  BREAKING: THE SUPREME COURT JUST JOINED THE CORPORATE ATTACK ON
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    FUNDING FOR PUBLIC TRANSIT ==========================================
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    WORKING PEOPLE, BUT WE WON'T SIT QUIETLY. JOIN US:  ================
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    Local advocacy groups are calling on Governor Andrew Cuomo and state
      
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    lawmakers to increase government funding for public transit in the Rochester
      
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    region..
      
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Monday, July 16

Friday, July 13

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